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Reading Quran on the bus or other public places
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Thread: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

  1. #1

    Default Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    I received my copy of the Quran (for which I am extremely grateful) from CAIR, and with the Quran they included some general directions for the treatment of the Quran.
    This was all new to me, and has given me some questions.
    My favorite place to read is on the bus while commuting to and from work. I must have read about 90% of the Bible during daily bus commutes.
    To read on the bus, I carry my books in a backpack. This isn't normally an issue, but now I am concerned about one thing:

    I am concerned that if there are any Muslims around me on the bus, they may feel that I am not being properly respectful if I just pull the book out and start reading without prayers, etc. or just stuff into my backpack if I am about to miss my stop (which isn't a rare situation since I get wrapped up in what I am reading).

    Would anyone here react negatively if they saw my behavior?
    There is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is his Prophet.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashmath1024 View Post
    I received my copy of the Quran (for which I am extremely grateful) from CAIR, and with the Quran they included some general directions for the treatment of the Quran.
    This was all new to me, and has given me some questions.
    My favorite place to read is on the bus while commuting to and from work. I must have read about 90% of the Bible during daily bus commutes.
    To read on the bus, I carry my books in a backpack. This isn't normally an issue, but now I am concerned about one thing:

    I am concerned that if there are any Muslims around me on the bus, they may feel that I am not being properly respectful if I just pull the book out and start reading without prayers, etc. or just stuff into my backpack if I am about to miss my stop (which isn't a rare situation since I get wrapped up in what I am reading).

    Would anyone here react negatively if they saw my behavior?
    no

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Salam brother

    in my humble opinion and limited knowledge the respect a book deserves is that people read it and and with the intention of learning from it. I cannot see any worries at all. I enclose reply from UI web site on a similar matter

    http://www.understanding-islam.com/r...72&sscatid=112

    I would also suggest to see the translation done by Moiz Amjad of Qur'an on the Understanding Islam web site. I found it very helpful.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Thank you both for your replies.

    Doc, are you saying that Moiz Amjad has published a translation of the Quran in English which you recommend? Or are you referring to commentary he has written on the Quranic text?
    There is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is his Prophet.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Salam brother Ashmath

    I am referring to the still incomplete translation on the UI web site. However if you are reading the translation from the beginning , you will find the first few chapters are completed. I found it very helpful. My understanding is that Moiz Amjad will God Willing complete the translation, some time. I enclose the link.

    Please share your feelings and views after reading the Qur'an

    http://www.understanding-islam.com/r...ry.asp?catid=3

    kind regards
    Waseem

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Peace Ashmath

    No one would consider it wrong for you to read a translation of the Qur'an. There are no prayers required for reading it. If you read the actual Qur'an, then it is essential to be in a state of ritual purity, but as you're reading a translation, there is no such requirement.

    Regards ~ Wasalaam

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Salam Haroon,
    If you read the actual Qur'an, then it is essential to be in a state of ritual purity, but as you're reading a translation, there is no such requirement.
    Please explain this further. Is it an interpretation that you hold this to be true or is it in actuality the case? What is your evidence?

    Regards

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Assalaamu'alaikum

    My apologies, I wasn't specific. What I mean by ritual purity here is to not be in a state of janaaba. With regards to touching the Qur'an, I am well aware of the difference of opinion however, our muftis at the local Darul-Ifta deem it wajib to have wudhu before touching the Qur'an. This ruling only applies to Muslims, however. If you wish to get into meaningful dialogue, I recommend you speak to a mufti.

    Regards ~ Wassalaam

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Salam Haroon,

    Thanks for the response.
    If you wish to get into meaningful dialogue, I recommend you speak to a mufti.
    Maybe you can invite them here? I have access to Muftis alhamdulilah, but what about you? You accept one interpretation over the other, maybe if you can show me your reasoning then if I hold a wrong opinion you would be able to help me realize it. I think this would be positive. Your local Darul Iftah seem wise as I would recommend something along those lines; when you approach the Qur'an do so with as much of a purified mind, body, and soul. No difference in that. My only question is how was it arrived at that one must be (Fard, unlike the wajib (duty) opinion of Darul Iftah) physically purified (wudu) to touch it? Also, how you concluded that this was the correct opinion and therefore adopted it?

    Regards

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    From the UI web site


    It is not mandatory to do wudhu (ablution) before recitation of the Qur'an. Obviously, for the purpose of teaching Islam to non-Muslims, they can and should be invited to the kind of gatherings that you have mentioned in your question and, obviously, be allowed to read the Qur'an without ablution. The Prophet (pbuh) recited the Qur'an in front of non-Muslims, whether Jews, Christians or Polytheists, but he never asked them to do ablution, before listening to the Qur'an. I really do not see any difference in listening to or reading the Qur'an.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Assalaamu'alaikum Ron

    Fiqh, essentials of fiqh and the determining of rulings and the legal status of an action or set of actions takes years to study in darul-uloom. One thing I realised is the lack of real knowledge on our forum. Fiqh is something that is studied, and it is very deep. The typical Hanafi darul-uloom takes 3-5 years in teaching the Hidayah, the book that contains the essentials of the Hanafi fiqh and the basis of the legal rulings that are given. Each issue is shown and explained, i.e. how it is derived from the Qur'an, Sunnah and Ahadith. It is something which requires a great deal of study and here and now is not the time and place for it. I am not learned in that field, and those that are, teach in the darul-ulooms. I merely gave the verdict as I know to be the truth from the 'ulama ikraam, and directed those who wish to know more to ask those who know more, i.e. the 'ulama ikraam. Rather than question each point, I sincerely advise everyone who wishes to learn more, to learn what you may call "the traditional way". There are darul-ulooms all around the world. Enroll and learn from the scholars.

    My only question is how was it arrived at that one must be (Fard, unlike the wajib (duty) opinion of Darul Iftah) physically purified (wudu) to touch it?
    I don't understand your placing the word "fard" in there. As such, I had this explained to me a while back but it involved a lot of technical words which I have forgotten. If I recall correctly, the ruling is given based on derivatives from the ayah in Surah Waqiyah where Allah subhanhu wa ta'ala says "la yamassuhu illal-mutahharun". I think this is the case, or I may be mistaken so don't quote me on it. Like I said, learn from those who are learned if you wish to know. I have long come to realise that conclusions we tend to draw on this site are far from scholarly. That is not intended as an insult, but it is my personal opinion.

    Regards ~ Wassalaam

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Salam Haroon,

    I think we agree on the point of studying. However, I must point out that studying does not mean taking what a scholar says for granted and just going along with it. Studying also means to assert one's self in the field and following up on knowledge. When a student stops investigating...when a student stops questioning...when a student stops thinking...the student is no longer a student and is no longer learning. Learning does not stop with a scholar; in fact, it begins and ends with the self. After all, we are the one's responsible for our actions and beliefs. Now here is the problem with what you have stated; you answered someone's question about touching the Qur'an by saying:
    If you read the actual Qur'an, then it is essential to be in a state of ritual purity, but as you're reading a translation, there is no such requirement.
    When asked to elaborate on this statement you clarified:
    What I mean by ritual purity here is to not be in a state of janaaba. With regards to touching the Qur'an, I am well aware of the difference of opinion however, our muftis at the local Darul-Ifta deem it wajib to have wudhu before touching the Qur'an. This ruling only applies to Muslims, however.
    Yet, still the point was how did you arrive that this was a correct understanding and to this you said:
    I merely gave the verdict as I know to be the truth from the 'ulama ikraam, and directed those who wish to know more to ask those who know more, i.e. the 'ulama ikraam.
    You know it to be the truth because someone you consider to be "'ulama ikraam" told you so...and you went along. But, and that's a significant "but," you not only applied it to yourself, you actually passed it on. You passed on information regarding Islam you thought to be the truth but in reality aren't sure since:
    As such, I had this explained to me a while back but it involved a lot of technical words which I have forgotten. If I recall correctly, the ruling is given based on derivatives from the ayah in Surah Waqiyah where Allah subhanhu wa ta'ala says "la yamassuhu illal-mutahharun". I think this is the case, or I may be mistaken so don't quote me on it. Like I said, learn from those who are learned if you wish to know.
    I highly doubt that the learned scholars you speak of ever mentioned this verse as being the verse related to touching the Qur'an. The question then becomes, did you investigate? did you analyze? did you approach the subject unbiasly to know the truth that you accepted? If you had not done any of this, and much more, then how did you accept it? and more importantly how did you pass it on without knowing for sure?

    Let us deal with the verses for everyone's benefit:

    No [this is not inspired by the devils among Jinn]. I call to witness the places where the stars fall - and it is indeed a great testimony, had you only known - this is indeed a most honorable Qur'an; in a book, well guarded. No one touches it except the most cleansed [angels]. [It is] a revelation from the Lord of the worlds. Al-Waaqi`ah 56: 75 - 80

    As you can see this is in regards to the revelatory process and how no one (i.e. Jinn) may have interefered with the revelation as it came. It is an answer to Quraish's accusations that the Prophet (pbuh) may have been inspired/taught the Qur'an. But the answer is in the verse that they couldn't even come near it because the revelation itself and even the process was guarded and only the purified (here being the Angels because they were bringing it down not the Jinn) were the only ones to touch it. While you may not appreciate this interpretation I will give you one that you are most likely fond of:

    (In a Book Maknun.) meaning glorious; in a glorious, well-guarded, revered Book. Ibn Jarir narrated that Isma`il bin Musa said that Sharik reported from Hakim, that is Ibn Jubayr, from Sa`id bin Jubayr, from Ibn `Abbas that about: (Which none touches but the pure ones.) he said, "The Book that is in heaven.'' Al-`Awfi reported from Ibn `Abbas about: (Which none touches but the pure ones.) that `the pure ones' means: "The angels.'' Similar was said by Anas, Mujahid, `Ikrimah, Sa`id bin Jubayr, Ad-Dahhak, Abu Ash-Sha`tha' Jabir bin Zayd, Abu Nahik, As-Suddi, `Abdur-Rahman bin Zayd bin Aslam and others. Ibn Jarir narrated that Ibn `Abdul-A`la said that Ibn Thawr said that Ma`mar said from Qatadah about: (Which none touches but the pure ones.) that he said, "None can touch it, with Allah, except the pure ones. However, in this life, the impure Zoroastrian and the filthy hypocrite touch it.'' And he said, "In the recitation of Ibn Mas`ud it is: (مَا يَمَسُّهُ إِلَّا الْمُطَهَّرُونَ) (It is not touched, except by the pure ones.) Abu Al-`Aliyah said: (Which none touches but the pure ones.) "It does not refer to you, because you are sinners!'' Ibn Zayd said, "The Quraysh disbelievers claimed that the devils brought down the Qur'an. Allah the Exalted stated that only the pure ones touch the Qur'an, as He said: (And it is not the Shayatin who have brought it down. Neither would it suit them nor they can (produce it). Verily, they have been removed far from hearing it.)(26:210-212)'' This saying is a good saying, and does not contradict those before it...

    And that's from Ibn Kathir's tafseer. Clearly, this verse has nothing to do with touching the Qur'an. So no one can use this verse to say it means that we should have wudu when we touch it. Just remember, I'm not saying people should not have wudu when they touch the Qur'an, I'm merely asking why you have accepted an opinion which is not even an interpretation of the most learned of learned. Did you ask those scholars around you about it? Did they mention this verse? If they did, would you ask them how they arrived at this conclusion when the greatest scholars did not? The point here is not to make anyone look bad or show off your knowledge. The point is to be careful about your religion. You are an incredibly pious man and masha'Allah you are well versed but don't we all have a responsiblity? Aren't we supposed to investigate our religion? Aren't we supposed to be sure that what is being fed to us is actually correct?
    I don't understand your placing the word "fard" in there.
    Wajib and fard are different. If you say that our religion orders us to perform wudu before we touch the Qur'an then that is fard. My understanding from your response was that it is fard. Then you said someone said it is wajib.
    Rather than question each point, I sincerely advise everyone who wishes to learn more, to learn what you may call "the traditional way".
    The traditional way has never been the way of sheep...we don't just follow.
    I have long come to realise that conclusions we tend to draw on this site are far from scholarly.
    This is a forum where people like you and I discuss topics...tell me the name of the person who said this is what you concluded not to be true and I'll take care of him

    Regards

  13. #13

    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    I am blessed to have found this translation; I am very glad that CAIR decided to distribute this one. I have found it to be the most easy to understand in English, and its notes are very helpful. I have tried to read other translations, but this is the only one I have been able to read for any length of time. It has increased my appreciation of and understanding of Islam.
    The only down side is that it is extremely heavy (for a book) - 8 pounds.
    Last edited by Ashmath1024; 18th June 2007 at 03:53.
    There is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is his Prophet.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    Assalaamu'alaikum Ron

    You cannot draw me into an argument, I'm afraid, as I'm not going to waste my time banging my head against your wall. I have explained my stance, and that's all there is to it; I could pick out each point of yours and answer, but to what end? Our arguments are not scholarly. A person clicking a link and opening all the books of hadith doesn't become a muhaddith, just as a person opening the books of tafsir doesn't become a mufassir. You know well enough, my old friend, that I do my fair bit of questioning and don't follow with my eyes shut. I am not concerned what you deduced from my posts, but the point of having wudhu for touching the Qur'an, has been explained to me, clearly and I accept it. The fault is mine of not being able to explain it further, for I am no scholar. Simple as that.

    Do du'a for me as I intend to go soon and join up to study in the darul-ulooms that I keep advertising .

    Regards ~ Wassalaam

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    Default Re: Reading Quran on the bus or other public places

    My prayers are with you.

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