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Thread: The dark side of Dubai

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    Moderator shaad_lko's Avatar
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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Thank you for this article - it is quite revealing - wish I had never gone to those beaches at least..
    Nine things the Lord has commanded me: Fear of God in private and in public; Justness, whether in anger or in calmness; Moderation in both poverty and affluence; That I should join hands with those who break away from me; And give to those who deprive me; And forgive those who wrong me; And that my silence should be meditation; And my words remembrance of God; And my vision keen observation.- Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Salam aleikum,

    I have read this article only yesterday....and I do agree with a lot that is written in it. I have been living in Dubai for 2 months before I have moved to Abu Dhabi. Dubai is a very artificial place, and I think the sentence "don't judge the book by it's cover applies very well" As all the flashiness disappears when you actually think how much debt Dubai has by building all those pretty buildings. Also, the people that come there don't seem to be thinking ....they think that If they have a contact with a company it will guaranty them financial security .....well like everywhere, companies in Dubai close down and breach contracts....this is just peoples' insensibility not to spend their money wisely. The problem is Dubai is full of temptations, and when you see all those nice cars and rich people wearing Gucci and LV clothes and bags, they want the same, and they spin out of control. We as Muslims see it differently because we know that the tangible things are not what really brings us happiness, but for "western" people buying things to keep happy is a part of life.

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    Moderator shaad_lko's Avatar
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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    yeah, its everyone in the rat race - one of my cousins (a practising Hijabi ) moved from Dubai to Canada and she is a lot happier in the latter place..

    However, I'll add here as a caveat that don't assume that just because anyone has a Muslim name or was born into a Muslim family, he/she would conform to your image of a believer per the Quran..

    Waleykumussalam.
    Nine things the Lord has commanded me: Fear of God in private and in public; Justness, whether in anger or in calmness; Moderation in both poverty and affluence; That I should join hands with those who break away from me; And give to those who deprive me; And forgive those who wrong me; And that my silence should be meditation; And my words remembrance of God; And my vision keen observation.- Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Yes of course I do not assume and generalise to only one Muslim image, I guess I just formulated my thoughts the wrong way...

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Quote Originally Posted by Hebah View Post
    We as Muslims see it differently because we know that the tangible things are not what really brings us happiness, but for "western" people buying things to keep happy is a part of life.
    Wasalaam,

    First off thank you DocW for the article, it was an enthralling read. I do feel it was ofc biased and presented facts in a way to always make the authors point than be fully open, but maybe it was good to show us what is under the veil of Dubai.

    Secondly Hebah: unfortunately, a lot of Muslims DO behave like this, in the middle east too. Materialism and sinful decadance grasps a lot of Muslims there too. The beautiful spirit of Islam is lost for these people.

    Peace
    “None of you truly believes until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.”

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    Veteran Member MF's Avatar
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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Thanks for sharing Doc, haven't done reaing completely

    "In Saudi, it's hard to be straight when you're young. The women are shut away so everyone has gay sex. But they only want to have sex with boys – 15- to 21-year-olds. I'm 27, so I'm too old now. I need to find real gays, so this is the best place. All Arab gays want to live in Dubai."
    Its strange, my mother has told me ages ago that arabs like young (blond) boys and here it is confirmed again.
    “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    This article is old, it was written in apr 2009. Second, Dubai's debt isn't much official figure is around $100 billion, lets say unofficial is maximum around $200 billion which I don't believe it is. It shouldn't be more than $120 billion. Any how compare it to Ireland which has more than 1 trillion of debt and GDP is about the same as UAE.

    UAE is not even on the top 20 list: http://www.cnbc.com/id/30308959/The_...Debtor_Nations

    As for the article, it is highly biased. Here is a response written by expat here:
    "The dark side of Dubai", an 8,860-word essay by Johann Hari, an award-winning star writer with The Independent in the UK, was published in the newspaper's magazine on April 7, 2009. It went on to serve its author well, last year winning him the national newspaper section in the Amnesty Media Awards and forming part of a portfolio of three articles that bagged him the Martha Gellhorn Prize "for journalism at the cutting edge ... that challenges secrecy and mendacity in public affairs".

    Now, however, amid revelations of widespread plagiarism in Hari's work, a prominent UK journalist is calling for the 32-year-old to be stripped of his Gellhorn, while on June 30 the council of the Orwell Prize for Journalism announced that "given the seriousness of the allegations that have been made" it was investigating its awarding of the Orwell to Hari in 2008. So far, no word from Amnesty.

    In April 2009, far from the gaze of the Amnesty and Gellhorn prize judges, Saul, stung to indignation by what he had read, conducted a forensic analysis of Hari's Dubai article. He identified a number of minor but troubling inconsistencies, inaccuracies and distortions, but was more concerned about two essentially anonymous and, crucially, unidentifiable characters whom Hari had quoted at length.

    The first was "Karen Andrews", an expat who supposedly had fallen on hard times and was living in her Range Rover in the car park of "one of Dubai's finest international hotels". This, commented Saul, sounded "completely made up", along with the rest of her story, told at length in direct quotes.

    And Hari's article went further. "All over the city," he claimed, "there are maxed-out expats sleeping secretly in the sand-dunes or the airport or in their cars."

    The "utter implausibility of this section of the article", wrote Saul, "makes it hard to take anything seriously"....

    Hari, he told The National, has "committed three journalistic crimes. First, he has pretended that words spoken to other journalists were in fact said to him. That is plagiarism, pure and simple. Secondly, he makes things up. There is no doubt in my mind that many of the people he supposedly encounters - such as the girl in hot pants in Dubai - are figments of his imagination. Thirdly, he distorts the words of the real people he does manage to interview."

    One such real person is Ahmed Al-Attar, a UAE blogger whom Hari interviewed while in Dubai. Al-Attar's blog, An Emirati's Thoughts, shows him to be a progressive, liberal thinker, keenly aware of the region's pressing social and political issues. But in Hari's article he emerges as a cartoonish, spoilt Emirati, with a "Panglossian" outlook, who is smugly content with the status quo in his "Santa Claus state".

    On July 12, Walters reported that he had spoken to Al-Attar, who claimed Hari's account of their meeting was "a gross distortion, and consists of statements that Ahmed says he never made". Neither does Ahmed speak, as Hari wrote, "American English", and nor had they met, as Hari had claimed, in "an identikit Starbucks", but in a hotel beach cafe.

    And then there are the seven named and quoted characters in Hari's article who cannot be traced, including "Sahinal Monir, a slim 24-year-old from the deltas of Bangladesh", to whom Hari somehow managed to gain access for an interview in a labour camp.

    Saul says he was prompted to respond at the time because he found Hari's article "disappointing because, maybe out of a false sense of patriotism, I expect publications like The Independent to be honest. I was also disappointed in another way, that any valid points he made - such as maybe there is an element of money-chasing here, maybe some expats aren't the nicest people, maybe some labourers should be treated better - are rendered worthless by the fact they are nestled amongst a pile of ..." After some stronger words, he settles for "exaggerations".

    Full article: http://www.thenational.ae/business/m...ai?pageCount=0
    One last thing about Canada, and why people move there like it. Which in my opinion is gonna create immigration issues like it is creating in Europe.
    1. If you live in Canada for 3 years, they give you Canadian nationality. In UAE, how many years you live can't get you nationality, they look at what a person has contributed to the country and that can get nationality here. But rules are here very strict about nationality.
    2. Canada you can get free health care. In UAE free health care by the govt is for nationals only. Expats have free health care but that is suppose to be given by the employer. Which brings to the next point.
    3. I don't know about Canada laws, but in UAE if you are out of work you can only stay for 30 days (or 60 days for UK nationals). It is changing with the new property laws, if you have bought a property here you can get a residence visa, if you meet the criteria of min. aed 10,000 income per month and have health care insurance.

    Immigration laws are very strict here, which makes many people uneasy. I know people have moved to Canada, main reason I found out was the easy immigration laws. But it is easy now, but later it will have same problem as western Europe. Lax laws sound good but they create more problems later on. Another thing, life in Dubai is very fast paced, even compared to most western countries. It doesn't go well with lot of people. It is not about living a materialistic life, if life was relaxed here most people would have find it easy even with the materialism in Dubai. I see when people get more money, they do the same in Canada, buying designer clothes, etc... With Dubai no tax and heaven for shopping; it just makes it cheaper and easier. But lot of people don't spend on useless stuff in Dubai, so it comes down to person.

    Lastly, sex outside of marriage is not allowed in Dubai, let alone sex with minors.

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Here is another counter-point article http://my.telegraph.co.uk/expat/anna...taken-to-task/

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    But this is od news DocW. Very.

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    Veteran Member MF's Avatar
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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    hyd, you are one of the expats, have you been trained not to look at the foreign underclass?

    Why do the Dubai bashers even exist? what is their motive to bash?
    “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Quote Originally Posted by MF View Post
    hyd, you are one of the expats, have you been trained not to look at the foreign underclass?
    huh? Holland doesn't have foreign underclass? Are you trained to not to look at them?

    Quote Originally Posted by MF View Post
    Why do the Dubai bashers even exist? what is their motive to bash?
    Bashers exist for almost every issue as far as I can see, whether true or false. Their motives not sure, maybe it is an Arab city and they like to bash them, because take the above article it is full of exaggerations and even made up stuff. I only met one journalist who bashed Dubai, and after having a long discussion his reasoning narrowed down to this: "Dubai should stick to oil." He didn't even know Dubai doesn't really have oil. There are few oil fields, but they don't produce much oil.

    If Dubai is such a bad place than why all the expats come here and living here. 80% of the population is expats.
    Last edited by hyd; 4th December 2011 at 23:09.

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    i think to be balanced Dubai is not as bad as the article paints it to be - I have lived there for some time. Now, to the counterpoint, the freedom is obviously limited in the sense that it is not a democracy or a republic, though it is quite liberal in many ways. In other words, if you work and enjoy, no one bothers you but you don't have a license to talk about the government, stir up agitations et al- do that and you're gone.

    So, its more or less a mix of a traditional Arab society with all the glitz and glamour of the West - some would like it, some would not..
    Nine things the Lord has commanded me: Fear of God in private and in public; Justness, whether in anger or in calmness; Moderation in both poverty and affluence; That I should join hands with those who break away from me; And give to those who deprive me; And forgive those who wrong me; And that my silence should be meditation; And my words remembrance of God; And my vision keen observation.- Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)

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    Veteran Member MF's Avatar
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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    Its a matter of opinion then, however I do believe something is seriously wrong with a modern form of slavery. Its not something we have in my country, taking away passports and let people work in terribly worse conditions for allmost no money.

    If it happens here, you go to jail

    I have to say once I was verry interested to see Dubai, when it was still on the rise but it turned out to be an air bubble, its no longer celebrity hot at the moment and then the desert climate is killing hot and everything is cultivated. I think there are other places in the world I would like to see much more.
    “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

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    Default Re: The dark side of Dubai

    I fly in on Bahdobian's national airline. 150 years ago this counry had no aeroplanes – camels were used for transport. Now they operate a fleet of carbon-belching planes, allowing people to flit from continent to continent in search of instant gratification. Whilst I feel this kind of form of travel is unethical, it is very useful for helping journalists such as myself to get to important destinations quickly. I refuse to watch Top Gear playing on the in flight entertainment. The works of Lenin and Marx shall be my only companions on this journey. I settle into my first class seat.


    'Are you a slave?' I ask the smiling stewardess. Katy Framione from Essex looks at me blankly as she offers me a glass of a particularly cheeky Chablis, her wide, empty Bahdobian smile beaming up at me as she crouches, shamed at my elbow. 'I'm sorry?' she says, clearly not understanding what she is part of. The poor woman doesn't even realise that she is an indentured worker, forced to slave her life away at 40,000 feet, never to return home. Behind her smile I read her mind – she knows, but cannot admit what she sees and feels. I smile at her. 'Take courage,' I say, 'I hear you – I hear you.' I pat her on the head encouragingly. I write down her innermost thoughts on my notepad as she backs slowly away from me. The look of fear on her face is thanks to me, I congratulate myself – I have opened her eyes.

    http://blogs.oracle.com/christophers...ashing_article
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